Urban design is both a process and an outcome of creating localities in which people live, engage with each other, and engage with the physical place around them.

Urban design is concerned with the arrangement, appearance and function of our suburbs, towns and cities. It is both a process and an outcome of creating localities in which people live, engage with each other, and engage with the physical place around them.

Urban design involves many different disciplines including planning, development, architecture, landscape architecture, engineering, economics, law and finance, among others.

Urban design operates at many scales, from the macro scale of the urban structure (planning, zoning, transport and infrastructure networks) to the micro scale of street furniture and lighting. When fully integrated into policy and planning systems, urban design can be used to inform land use planning, infrastructure, built form and even the socio-demographic mix of a place.

  • Creating Places for People: An Urban Design Protocol for Australian Cities (www.urbandesign.org.au)

 

Urban design is the process of designing and shaping cities, towns and villages.

In contrast to architecture, which focuses on the design of individual buildings, urban design deals with the larger scale of groups of buildings, streets and public spaces, whole neighborhoods and districts, and entire cities, with the goal of making urban areas functional, attractive, and sustainable.


For more information on definitions of urban design, visit:  Urban Design Group UK